Dr Papandreou (back row, first left) with colleagues at University College London

Supported by a prestigious Research Training Fellowship, Dr Apostolos Papandreou is leading a study to help children with a rare, devastating and, sadly, life limiting neurological disease.

What are we doing?

This research will investigate how genetic changes associated with BPAN alter the way brain cells work. It will also look to identify measurable indicators of the presence and severity of the disease.

These markers will be important for the next phase of the project, as they could possibly represent a quantifiable indication of the effectiveness of potential drug treatments.

MEET THE DOCTOR: 

Dr Apostolos Papandreou

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Jessica Lake

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“Having cared for children with BPAN, I’m aware of the severe disability the condition causes, the poor understanding of the disease mechanisms involved and the lack of effective treatments,” says Dr Papandreou. “These are the very issues I’d like to address through my research.”

“My goal is to improve understanding of the ways in which brain cells malfunction in BPAN and find drug treatments that may lessen or even reverse this malfunction in the laboratory,” says Dr Papandreou. “Drugs that show the most promise could then be tested further and put forward for future clinical trials, with the ultimate aim of developing treatments that improve the lives of both children with BPAN and their families.”

“BPAN has certain similarities to some other devastating neurological conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease,” says Dr Papandreou. “It’s possible our findings will be helpful in the search for new ways to treat these conditions too.”